Discussion Board Posts

css.php

On Worker’s Leaving the Factory {Liza}

In the film Worker’s Leaving the Factory, it’s interesting to see the way various time periods, countries and cultures deal with workers, and working. We are treated to the experience of workers leaving their jobs under normal circumstances and under strained circumstances. We see various strikes taking place throughout. The narration also makes a difference in how we view the scenes and this can be very suggestive in certain scenes especially when they are detached from earlier scenes such as the woman waiting for her boyfriend, she has to leave because her friends are calling her before she misses her …

Continue Reading

Joyce Larson Comments on Film and History and “Rock Hudson’s Home Movies”

Joyce Larson  Comments on Film and History and “Rock Hudson’s Home Movies” Elefthenia Thanouli in Film and History: A Tale of Two Disciplines writes that “what distinguishes history on screen is the dominant role of the narration.  Historical books surely contain narration, too, but the process itself is downplayed….”  Thanouli goes on to say that compared to a written account, narration in historical films “always comes across as openly fabricated and, by extension, potentially false.” I have struggled in trying to assess the role of the narrator in “Rock Hudson’s Home Movies” in the context of the excerpts we read …

Continue Reading

Fragments of reality in films and history

While reflecting about the relationship between film and history I came across with memories of my own life witch have remained intact and vivid thanks to home videos my father used to make. Of course when I go deep into those memories and recreate in my mind those feelings, smells and many other details that are not included in the films it becomes clear how those images only represent a fraction of reality which can be interpreted in many ways. Those films are there only there to help but not fully recreate memories, much less the complexity of the reality …

Continue Reading

Film and History, Rock Hudson (Tian)

I am not certain whether I should describe the “meta” device used in Mark Rappaport’s Rock Hudson’s Home Movies (1992) as metacinematic or metahistorical. Perhaps, it is both metacinematic and metahistorical. I am interested in the technological and narrative strategies that are involved in telling the stories of Rock Hudson through his cinema. The footages appear to be digitalized or transcoded from the film medium to the video medium, which indeed possesses the look of a “home movie.” The film’s narrator Rock Hudson (Eric Farr) also tells us that Hudson used to show those clips to his friends and laugh …

Continue Reading

Rock Hudson Hiding in Plain Sight

While watching the film Rock Hudson Home Movies, I realized that not only did Rock Hudson have to act on camera but he also had to act while off camera. I liked the idea of the narrative being used as well because this finally gave a voice to his struggle of having to hide his true identity his entire life. He talks about how hard it was being gay in the 1950’s. We know from our history books that gender roles became more traditional for men and women in the U.S. post-WW II. I liked how the film made use …

Continue Reading

Rock Hudson

I was very interested to watch this documentary about Rock Hudson mainly because I recognized his name from watching Netflix’s miniseries Hollywood. The style in which the documentary was formatted was very different from the usual style that documentaries take on. For example, instead of having a narrator giving us the information, everything was told from Rock Hudson’s point of view. This allowed for a connection to be made with the audience and for the audience to understand what Hudson went through on a more personal level. I knew that the Rock Hudson portrayed in Hollywood was a fictionalized version of …

Continue Reading

Constructing history through film

In History and Film: A Tale of Two Disciplines, Thanouli describes several approaches to comparisons between the study of history and the medium of film, especially in regard to how both historians and film-makers line up and contextualize the “real”—historical happenings; physical objects and people moving in space—into certain narrative frames in order to give them meaning. Thanouli quotes Barthes describing this phenomenon in literature: “By replacing the signified with the illusion of the referent and by multiplying these referents in a superfluous manner, novelists and historians alike appear to objectively record the world around them.” Rock Hudson’s Home Movies …

Continue Reading

Your silence is costing. Your silence is suicide. – DM

I am at a point in the semester that it is almost impossible to disconnect from the readings and not mixing up different seminar topics, even when they don’t seem to have much in common at first. And it was exactly this that happened while watching Marlon Riggs’ Tongues Untied (1989). I will explain, I promise. I did a presentation yesterday in my Sound in Society class (Ethnomusicology). The topic was “Signifying aural difference” and my presentation was about Brandon LaBelle’s Acoustic Territories: Sound Culture and Everyday Life (2010). My conclusions were: 1) The matter of domesticating the outside, 2) …

Continue Reading

Institutions, democracy, and voices.

In B. J. Bullert’s book, one of the concepts that struck me most is “cultural authorities.” I do not think this concept can be discussed without the “public sphere” or the democratic society of the First World. Television producers have multiple tasks, and one of them is to select content to for broadcasting. Yet, it seems there are so many forces, from the audience, corporations, and government, that interfered with the producers’ decisions to show Marlon Riggs’s Tongues Untied. I noticed that an interesting choice of words here: “democracy requires a media system that allows for the relatively free expression …

Continue Reading

Queer Cinema and Tongues Untied

In the Rich article there was criticism by other film-makers, in relation to lesbian and gay filmmaking, the author argued that Lesbian and filmmakers of color need gay film festivals because often this is the only place where their films can be screened and critiqued and they argue that the people programming these festivals are often white gay men and women. This relates to Marlon Riggs work because he is a gay man of color. Marlon already felt ignored as a child of color growing up in a predominately white school where there was only one child of color other …

Continue Reading